Daylily Delights

After the flush of all the blooms in the garden at the end of May and beginning of June, things start to flag a little bit.  This is when my daylilies start putting on a show.  I love daylilies for several reasons:

  • They are super easy to grow–good for beginning gardeners
  • They don’t require any special fertilizing or watering (especially this summer of our never-ending rain)
  • Pests don’t bother them at all
  • They come in a wide variety of beautiful warm colors
  • They don’t require staking
  • They are perennials, so as they get bigger, you can divide them and enlarge your flower garden for free

What’s not to love?  Here are some of the ones growing in my garden right now:

Daylily 'Velvet Shadows'

Although this was advertised as being purple with a light throat, mine surely looks more burgundy to my eye.  In any event, this is a beauty.  This daylily stays quite short–it’s only about 12-15 inches tall, so it works well in a packed-out garden bed like mine, in a small garden or even in a container.

Daylily 'Fall Farewell'

I always thought the name of this daylily was a little off, because it blooms in July, rather than in fall, but nevertheless it has such gorgeous shrimp and yellow tones.  This is a medium-height daylily–mine is around two feet tall.  As you can see, my daylilies are not worried about sharing tight quarters in the flower bed with other plants–no fussy prima donnas here.  It grows well with the companion plants of ‘Marguerite’ daisies, nasturtium foliage and variegated sage.

Another look . . .

Daylily 'Fall Farewell' close up

Daylily 'Driving Me Wild' and companion plants

I got this next daylily several years ago at the Hardy Plant Society of Oregon plant sale.  I kind of got my wires crossed, in that I was looking for an iris called ‘Driving Me Wild’, but instead I saw the correct name but didn’t really pay attention that it was attached to a daylily plant.  It all worked out for the best, I think.   Other companion plants that bloom at the same time include the deep pink-flowered clematis ‘Princess Diana’, a blue delphinium, and pretty purple foliage from the purple sage, with seedpods of earlier-blooming columbine in the back.

Another look at this pretty daylily . . .

Daylily 'Driving Me Wild' and friends

Notice how well the shrimp-colored daylily goes with purple, and blue for that matter?  That is a good trick for mixing hard-to-mix shrimp colors into your mixed flower beds–add some purple and blue–opposites on the color wheel for great contrast.

Daylily 'Woodruff's Memory'

This daylily blooms a little later in July than the aforementioned ones.  It is also a bit taller than any of the others as well.  I’m not sure who Woodruff was–I get the feeling he was a WWII hero, or at least that’s what I think when I look at this lovely flower.

Another look . . .

Daylily 'Woodruff's Memory' closeup

They, whoever “they” is, said that you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, or I suppose by its title, but as soon as I saw the name of this daylily, I had to have it . . .

Daylily 'Thai Ballet'

I especially like any of the rose and pink-colored daylilies, rather than the orange ones, and so I just love the color of this.  All of the pink-ish dayliles do have orange undertones, but they are not a harsh orange.  I grow this with a lovely buddleja, butterfly bush, called ‘Lochinch’ that I got from Joy Creek Nursery.  The shrub is so big, I couldn’t really get a good picture of them together, but here is a picture of the butterfly bush for your consideration:

Buddleja 'Lochinch', lavender flowering shrub on the left

This picture of the front of our house pretty much explains why I can’t get a good shot of the two plants together–I’d need to be hung from a crane to get them at the right angle!

So that’s it from my garden this week.  Leave a comment if you like–they are always appreciated!  Do you grow daylilies, and if so which ones?  Do you grow them by themselves or with other plants?  And don’t forget to visit the Garden Party.

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About AthenaMG

Athena McElrath is a Master Gardener with a love for gardening, decorating and cooking inexpensively. She enjoys working out in her urban garden in Southwest Washington State, watching the hummingbirds and other birds and insects, eating the wonderful vegetables, fruits and herbs that she produces from her garden, and just having a great time hanging out under the pergola with her family and friends (that is, whenever it stops raining long enough).
companion plantings, drought tolerant plants, Perennials, Plant Combinations, Summer-flowering plants, , , Permalink

3 Responses to Daylily Delights

  1. allysgrandma says:

    I am always so struck by the beauty of your house and yard. Thanks for sharing.

  2. Your lillies are lovely! I especially like the front of your house…a true gardener’s delight!