Why I’m Not Here As Much As I Used To Be

 

 

Hello to everyone who took time out of their days to stop by my blog–I appreciate you, and welcome!

 

As you’ve probably noticed, I’ve not been posting as much as I used to do.  I thought you might wonder why, so I thought I’d share.

 

I started blogging back in 2009, and back then, Minerva’s Garden was a blog about my experiences gardening at our home.  I started reading blogs online about that time as well, and started to meet some of the blog authors via comments.  I enjoyed it then, and still do–it was fun to see what other people had going on in their gardens, and to meet other people who shared some of my interests.

 

Then I discovered blog parties.  These were focused events where you could see all sorts of gardens and garden projects, and I looked forward to sharing my garden there.

 

I did this for a year or so, and I started reading more and realizing that some people were actually making money off their blogs.  That had never crossed my mind when I started back in 2009, but the idea intrigued me.  I really didn’t know a lot about putting a blog together, or driving traffic to it, or any of the nuts and bolts that many people seemed to understand well, so I did even more reading.

 

Then the day came back around 2011 when the job I had suddenly didn’t exist anymore.  I looked for work, but mostly came up short.  And then I thought, maybe I could make money from my blog, too.

 

So I did a bunch more reading, and learned about monetization, and how to put a blog together, and then I reworked my blog in early 2012 and decided to go for it.

 

In order to make money, I had to reach more readers, so off to tons of blog parties I went.  I also had to have regular projects that I and my husband cranked out so I’d have something to share on the blog, so I decided to expand the scope of the blog to also include cooking and home decorating, both topics that I enjoy and have enjoyed since before my blogging days.

 

I put myself on a schedule of cranking out posts and participating at the parties.  And I did this regularly, without fail, for well over a year.  And the blog got noticed, too, and several of our projects were featured at several other other blogs, which was encouraging, and for which I felt honored and grateful.  I thought we must be doing something right, right?

 

But at the end of this time–around the middle of 2013–I started crunching the numbers, and realized that with all the hours I was putting into the blog, it just wasn’t paying enough, barely anything, to keep going at the pace I was. Back in the frenzy, I was putting in anywhere from 8-12 hours nearly everyday either working on projects, photographing projects, writing posts, making videos, and sharing it all at zillions of parties and all over social media.  I didn’t have a job at the time, so I threw myself into it, as if it was my full-time job (and then some).

 

This year, I’ve realized that my focus has changed a bit.  I still love gardening, cooking and home decorating, and I still plan to blog.  But the time I have available to spend on these endeavors in an online way has diminished rapidly, and frankly I need to put my energy into something that’s actually going to help pay the bills.

 

I also discovered that I am happiest when I am not constantly stuck in front of a computer screen.  There is life to be lived out there, and I’m not going to miss out on it because I was spending all my time online.  I am an extremely active person, and I love getting out and working face-to-face with other people, and making those connections.  I found I was a little isolated because I was spending so much time online, and I didn’t think it was that healthy for me, both physically and emotionally.

 

As I’ve mentioned here before, I act and sing, and last year my husband and I became board members at a local theatre company called Portland Actors Ensemble, whose focus is producing free Shakespeare in the Parks shows–they’ve been doing this for 45 years.  I love the fact that we are reaching an audience that might not otherwise have an introduction to Shakespeare or even live theatre–it can get pretty pricey to buy theatre tickets for a family of four for a night out of live theatre–I certainly do understand that.  I’m happy that I am able, in a small way, to help change that.

 

And I’ve been able to bring my blogging experience and help them with their new website re-build and newly launched blog, which I find very exciting.  As if the acting and blogging were not enough, I am also now the Educational Outreach coordinator for the group, and will be ready to go into rehearsals around July 1st for three other, new, Shakespeare shows that are geared for school-aged children (this is on top of rehearsing A Midsummer Night’s Dream, which opens July 12th), and I will have the privilege and responsibility of booking and scheduling the shows into schools and other venues.  Now my time is spent on acting Shakespeare, a huge thrill for an actor, let me tell you, and it will allow me to earn some money.  I feel like it’s the best of all possible situations for me–to use my training and experience to do something I love–I feel very fortunate.

 

I’m very excited to see where this all leads, and I am happily and by choice following this new road, but my online time here at Minerva’s Garden is consequently lessened.  I felt guilty about that for a while, like I should be blogging, but I know that the people who enjoy my blog will continue to read it, comment when they feel so led, and it will all be fine.  I’ve had to let go of the idea that I was going to make a living from my blog–it just wasn’t in the cards for me, although it may be for some of you. (Surprisingly, I am actually about to get my first Google ads payout in the fairly near future–yay–I think I’ll spend it on some plants or something fun for the house–it might just about cover that :)

 

For me, the pressure to produce is gone.  I plan on sharing posts when I have time and when I have something to say and share that I think others might be interested in, not on any regular, self-imposed, schedule, but as I am led to do so, just like back when I started blogging.  I’m comfortable with that, and I hope that you are as well.  I may even share some posts sometimes about other topics that I find interesting–we’ll see.

 

But I thought you might be wondering what was up, and I wanted to share that with you.

 

Thanks for stopping by, and have a great rest of your day!

 

 

 

If you liked this post, you can subscribe to Minerva’s Garden via email or RSS, Like us on Facebook, and Follow us on Twitter, and connect with us on You TubePinterest and Google +.  You can also follow us on Linky!

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Till next time,

Posted in Shakespeare Summer, thank you | Tagged , | 8 Comments

Late Spring Garden Walk At Minerva’s Garden Part 2–Roses

 

 

Hello, and I’m back with more of our garden walk.  Today I thought I’d focus on some of the many roses that are in bloom right now.

 

You’ll notice a couple of things about me and roses.  I am a sucker for cabbage roses, with many petals.

 

And I am a lover of all sorts of rose colors–I’m not really partial to any one color, but like to have a mix of them in the garden.

 

Without further ado, let’s take a walk!

The hybrid tea climber ‘Blaze’–it blooms off and on all summer long, and covers the roof of the potting shed.

 

Hybrid tea rose ‘Camelot’.  I am not a huge fan of the hybrid teas, although I still do have some in my garden, because in our rainy climate they always succumb to black spot and lose all of their leaves–it can even damage the forming rose buds.  Not cool.  They need perfect weather–warm and dry–and perfect air circulation around them–which is why you find them planted in what I call “rose ghettos” around here, with no other plants near them–and even with all that, they will often succumb to fungal diseases like black spot.  I’m not willing to spray them with pesticides to keep the black spot at bay, because I want beneficial insects and birds in the garden and don’t want to kill them, too, so I don’t usually do much about it except try to pick off the diseased leaves when I see them and put them in the trash.  Not the best looking plants for sure, but I do like them for cut flower arrangements and their very long blooming season, so I put up with a little plant ugliness in order to get those roses.

 

‘Cecile Brunner’ rose.  This plant looks all soft pink and innocent, and it is a pretty flower, but don’t let its looks deceive you–this plant gets gigantic in my garden–at least 12 feet tall, and it’s not in a great spot–in the vegetable terrace in the backyard, so it’s always a battle with it.  This year, I pruned the heck out of it, and we (it takes 2 people to deal with this thing) tied it up to a heavy post in the fenceline to keep it from falling over sideways every time it rains, which for here is all the time until the 4th of July.  That was 4 1/2 hours of our lives that we’ll never get back.  But I’ve got much better light and room in the veggi bed now, so it was worth it.  And the birds really like this one for a resting place–that’s the biggest reason why I still keep it.  I don’t have many trees in our small garden, so large shrubs take their place.

 

Another hybrid tea rose, this time in a luscious deep red.  (At this point, you must think all I grow is hybrid teas, but nothing could be further from the truth–I just focused on these today, and will branch out to the old garden roses soon!)  I have no idea of the variety–when we were visiting my parents at their garden zone 4 home, my dad dug this rose up, which was doing nothing at their house, and gave it to me to take home.  It was a little muddy nub about 12 inches long.  Now, it’s well over 8 feet tall and blooms with abandon at our house, and I always call it Dad’s rose :)  A gorgeous cut flower for arrangements.

 

Now, finally, here’s an old garden rose–’Jacques Cartier’–which repeat blooms after its initial flush of flowers, sharing pergola space with ‘Kardinal Warshinski’ clematis–it’s a darker rose color with blooms near the top of the roses, and ‘Einset’ red seedless table grape.  At this point, it’s kind of a tossup over who will win dominance over the top of the pergola roof, but my money is always on the grape–no matter how much I prune it, it gets huge every year and will completely cover the pergola roof by July, making a nice shady bower for hot afternoons.  I favor old garden roses in our garden because they are much less prone to black spot and all the other rose diseases that plague Pacific Northwest gardeners, and they are gorgeous.

 

A favorite rose of mine is the David Austin yellow-blooming ‘Graham Thomas’.  Although this is technically classified as a shrub rose, I’ve trained it to be a climber over a turquoise-colored arbor, and it’s a nice focal point in our backyard garden.

 

 

 

An unknown variety, but lovely, red rose that was growing here when we bought our home.  I’m guessing it’s a hybrid tea by the way it gets black spot, but who knows.

 

I’ve shown you some very large roses, so how about a smaller one?  This is an unknown variety of mini rose, in this lovely soft pink–it was growing in a container, planted by the previous owners, when we arrived here 13 years ago.  It is only about a foot tall and wide, and grows down in our lower terrace on the sidewalk in front of the house, and honestly, I don’t always get down there to water it much during the summertime, yet as long as it gets fertilized once a month starting in March, it usually blooms its little head off all summer long.  I grow it next to a huge but very fine-leafed santolina with yellow blooms–it will bloom soon, in June.

 

 

My best rose tips for the Pacific Northwest are:

  • Fertilize them with your favorite rose food–I use homemade complete organic fertilizer for the first feeding in March, and then switch to Miracle Grow thereafter–starting in March and repeating once a month through October.
  • For the hybrid teas and several of the other roses, keep them deadheaded as the blossoms fade to create more flowers and extend their bloom time.  I favor repeat-blooming roses, and so nearly all in my garden are in this category.
  • Pick them often, fill up a vase with them, and enjoy them in your home!

 

I’ll have yet more flower posts coming soon!

 

Do you grow roses, and do you have any rose-growing tips that work for you?  I’d love to hear about it down in the comments, so feel free to stop by and say hi!

 

If you liked this post, you can subscribe to Minerva’s Garden via email or RSS, Like us on Facebook, and Follow us on Twitter, and connect with us on You TubePinterest and Google +.  You can also follow us on Linky!

 

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Till next time,

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Posted in Hybrid Tea Roses, Old Garden Roses, Shrubs, Summer-flowering plants | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Late Spring Garden Walk at Minerva’s Garden Part 1

 

 

Hello one and all–long time, no see.  I’ve been busy with starting a new little job, and we are just starting rehearsals for A Midsummer Night’s Dream, playing in a city park near you this summer if you happen to live in Portland, Oregon.  I’m also gearing up to do Shakespeare shows in the fall, which means I’ve got over 90 pages to memorize by the middle of June–that doesn’t count Midsummer!  I love it all, and am so thankful that I have the chance to participate, but see what I mean by busy?  I’m also helping with the blog for the theatre company as well as social media, so I find my personal blogging time is shrinking.

 

However, I still want to share posts with you as I can, and the weather has been gorgeous here lately, so my hubs and I have been out cleaning the garden, planting and snapping photos!  I love this time of year–the garden is looking great, and so much is already in bloom or about to bloom, so it’s always an adventure each morning when I walk around the garden to see what’s new.  (Do you do that–take your morning cup of tea and walk around your garden, sipping and strolling?  I do, as often as I can–one of the best parts of spring and summer.)

 

Here’s what I saw over the course of a few days last and this week.

 

The vegetable garden beds are coming along pretty nicely.

 

Peas are up.

 

Potatoes, too–I’ve already had to hill them twice.  I’ve got a step-by-step tutorial on how I plant my peas and potatoes if you’d like to learn how, too.

 

I hardened off veggi. starts that I started myself from seed outside on our front stoop–it’s a bit warmer here and protected, so it helps the baby plants make the transition outdoors more easily.

 

And the eggplant and pepper starts went into their summer bed.  I had some really nice starts of these this year–makes up for last year when they were horrible and the peppers didn’t germinate at all inside.  Don’t have a clue what the difference was, but I’m happy things are looking up this year!  Since they need very warm temperatures to grow and ripen, I put hoops over the plants and covered them with clear plastic–basically a mini greenhouse here where they need it.

 

Now how about some flowers.

 

If you’ve been reading here for a while, you know that clematis vines are one of my all-time favorite flowers.  I’ve got several in the garden, and we even made a video about my roses and clematis that you might enjoy.

 

Here’s Clematis ‘Viola’ about to explode into bloom on our blue privacy fence.  If you keep it deadheaded, it tends to bloom all summer long, which is great.

 

Clematis ‘Niobe’–I love this one, because it blooms low on the vine, making it a perfect partner for climbing roses.  Another one that blooms all summer if you deadhead it.

 

I’m nuts about blue and light lavender clematis, and this is one of my favorite–Clematis ‘Fujimusume’.  ‘Viola’ is planted on the back of the blue fence, and this one on the front:

 

This is so pretty I could jump into the middle of this and swim around!

 

And this one was a lucky shot on my part–Clematis ‘Romantika’, the deepest of my dark purple clematis, paired with the electric Golden Hops vine–a stunning combo that lasts for months during the summer:

 

I’ll be back with more flowers soon!  (This is apparently going to be a long garden walk–I’ve got too many pictures and don’t want to turn this into the Baatan Death March, so will break them up into smaller groups for your reading pleasure:)

 

Are you gardening this spring?  I’d love to hear about it down in the comments, so feel free to stop by and say hi!

 

If you liked this post, you can subscribe to Minerva’s Garden via email or RSS, Like us on Facebook, and Follow us on Twitter, and connect with us on You TubePinterest and Google +.  You can also follow us on Linky!

 

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Till next time,

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Posted in Annuals, Clematis, Golden hops, Peppers, Perennials, Potatoes, Shrubs, Snow Peas, Spring-flowering plants, Summer-flowering plants, Vegetable gardening, Vines | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Fruit Pruning DIY Roundup From Minerva’s Garden

 

Hello everyone!  I hope you are enjoying the first signs of spring around your house and even your garden.  In the Pacific Northwest where I live, it’s still cold at night and often rainy during the day, but we have the happy circumstance of a lovely sunny day now and then, and it makes me want to get out in the garden in between all the memorizing I need to be doing for the summer play I’m cast in–A Midsummer Night’s Dream!  I can’t wait, and I will be playing opposite my sweet hubby in several scenes, which we haven’t done in years, so it should be fun.

 

 

There are, however, some late winter or early spring chores that need to get done around the garden, and pruning the fruit-bearing trees, canes and bushes figure prominently on my gardening to-do list for this time of year.  (For my new readers–I’m a Master Gardener and have been gardening on our current property for the last 13 years.  We grow flowers, vegetables, herbs and fruit on our single-city lot.)  I thought I’d put together a round-up of posts that I’ve written about how to prune apple and pear trees in an espaliered belgian fence configuration, as well as pruning grape vines, raspberry and blackberry canes, and other types of small-fruit maintenance tips to give your plants a great start for the season.  I give tips for how I fertilize these plants and how we’ve created support structures for them, all so they produce wonderful fruit later this summer and fall.

 

People sometimes get a little scared when it comes to pruning, but really, I say go for it!  I will give you some tips to avoid mishaps, but with a lot of these types of fruit, especially grapes, they are pretty forgiving if you don’t do it perfectly.  And the more often you practice pruning, the more you will see how your plants respond to the pruning, and the better you get at it, so I say, jump in and give it a go!  NOTE:  Always be safe–please wear long-sleeves and gloves, eye and ear protection anytime you are pruning plants–all it takes is one little twig to break off in the wrong direction and you can end up with a very nasty scratch to your eye or skin–I know from personal experience, so don’t let it happen to you.

 

A tip to help you get better at pruning:  Take a photo of your fruit plant before you begin pruning, and then after you are done pruning, and then one late in the summer when it’s about to produce fruit, and compare them–from this you’ll learn a great deal about how your pruning caused the plant to grow.

 

Have you ever wanted to try growing your own apples and pears, but thought that you couldn’t because you don’t have enough, or any, ground in which to plant?  I’ve had good success with creating from scratch an espaliered Belgian fence created out of mini-dwarf apple, crabapple, and pear trees that I learned how to graft myself, fitting 8 fruit trees into a two-foot by fifteen-foot growing space!  I have a video that talks about creating the Belgian fence, and I have this post that talks about how to prune your fruit trees so they stay in shape and produce fruit this fall:

 

Pruning An Espaliered Belgian Fence of Mini-Dwarf Apple, Crabapple and Pear Trees

 

 

Grafting and Espalier Creation Video:

 

For those with no ground, you might want to try growing mini-dwarf fruit trees in large containers.  I wrote an article for our local Master Gardeners’ newsletter a few years ago that goes into detail on how to succeed at this, and what fruit varieties work well in containers:

 

 source

Growing Mini-Dwarf Apple Trees In Containers

 

Berries are easy to grow, and so delicious when picked fresh from your garden.  Learn all my tips for pruning, fertilizing, and trellising cane fruits like raspberries and blackberries, as well as how to tidy up and fertilize your strawberries and other berries for optimal production this summer:

 

 

Berry Plant Care

 

 

Is there anything more perfect than a grape-covered pergola in the summer as a lovely spot for a glass of iced tea or an outdoor meal?  Learn about how we built our sturdy pergola using many recycled materials, and then how we grew a grapevine from a free cutting (yes, you read that correctly!) that now covers the pergola each year with glorious leaves, and beautiful bunches of table grapes in the late summer.  I cover pruning grapes for the complete beginner in detail, with illustrations and photos:

 

 

 

Pruning ‘Einset’ Grapes–Use Color Coding!

 

Enjoy the rest of your day!  If you have any questions about fruit pruning or growing fruit, please leave them in the comments section of this post, and I’ll do my best to answer them :)

 

Have you ever tried growing fruit?  I’d love to hear about it down in the comments, so feel free to stop by and say hi!

 

If you liked this post, you can subscribe to Minerva’s Garden via email or RSS, Like us on Facebook, and Follow us on Twitter, and connect with us on You TubePinterest and Google +.  You can also follow us on Linky!

 

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Thank you so much for your friendship and support–I appreciate it!

Till next time,

I’m participating at:

 Wow Us Wednesday at Savvy Southern Style

Feathered Nest Friday at French Country Cottage

Show and Tell Friday at My Romantic Home

Posted in 'Einset' grape, Apple and pear trees, Berries, Fruit, Pruning, Raspberries and Blackberries | Tagged , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Cats

 

Hello and Happy Valentine’s Day!  Glad to be back for a bit with you all.  The show has opened, and all is well :)  I may even get to clean my house again someday soon.

 

I awoke this morning and took this series of photos of our cats.  I thought they  . . .hey, . . . wait a minute!!  NO!!!

(Cats tackle Athena, pin her to the ground, and then proceed to take over the blog.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(A minor scuffle as Athena takes over the computer once again . . .)

 

And so I fed them, and afterward they took a nap.

 

Happy Valentine’s Day, all!

 

Do your cats take over your blog from time to time?  I’d love to hear about it down in the comments, so feel free to stop by and say hi!

 

If you liked this post, you can subscribe to Minerva’s Garden via email or RSS, Like us on Facebook, and Follow us on Twitter, and connect with us on You TubePinterest and Google +.  You can also follow us on Linky!

 

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

Thank you so much for your friendship and support–I appreciate it!

Till next time,

I’m participating at:

 Show and Tell Friday at My Romantic Home

Feathered Nest Friday at French Country Cottage

Posted in Cats | Tagged , , , | 14 Comments

More Valentine’s Day Decor 2014

 

 

Happy Monday!  Hope you had a lovely weekend.

 

I want to finish up my Valentine’s Decor posts for you with a few final pictures that I took last week.  I kept a lot of my January decor up, because much of it was white, and removed the yellow and chartreuse and added in pinks and reds to make it appropriate for Valentine’s.  The decorations are projects that I’ve made in the past–and I’ll have a link at the end of this post if you’d like to learn how to make them yourself–as well as a few new thrifted finds.  I never spend a lot of money on decorating, but I enjoy using color combinations, making things myself and just having fun with it.  If it makes me smile when I walk into a room, then as far as I’m concerned, I’ve succeeded.

 

So here goes with More Valentine’s Decor 2014!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So here’s to a happy Valentine’s Day to us all–I hope you spend it with someone you love.

 

For more Valentine’s Day ideas, check out these posts and board:

Valentine’s Decor 2014

 

Valentine’s Day Idea Roundup from Minerva’s Garden

 

Valentine’s Day Ideas Pinterest Board

 

Do you decorate for Valentine’s Day around your home?  I’d love to hear about it down in the comments, so feel free to stop by and say hi!

 

If you liked this post, you can subscribe to Minerva’s Garden via email or RSS, Like us on Facebook, and Follow us on Twitter, and connect with us on You TubePinterest and Google +.  You can also follow us on Linky!

 

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Thank you so much for your friendship and support–I appreciate it!

Till next time,

I’m participating at:

 Show and Tell Friday at My Romantic Home

Feathered Nest Friday at French Country Cottage

Posted in More Valentine's Day Decor 2014 | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

Valentine’s Decor 2014

 

 

Hi!  I didn’t think I’d be back this soon, but I couldn’t help myself :)  I was able to get some Valentine’s decorations up, and I want to share them with you before it’s too late.  I just made small changes, nothing major, that I could accomplish in the limited amount of time I had in which to work on this.  Also, I’m still under the weather and still having to motor on regardless as our show opens on Monday, so I’m on vocal rest at home during the days.  Since I can’t talk, I walked around the house this morning and took some pictures.

 

I think I’ll just let the pictures speak for themselves, and I hope you enjoy them!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have a few more Valentine’s decor pictures to share with you, so I’ll do that soon.  Have a great rest of your day!

 

If you’re looking for Valentine’s decorating ideas, you might enjoy this post:

 

Valentine’s Day Idea Roundup from Minerva’s Garden

 

And check out my Valentine’s Day Pinterest board for even more inspiration!

 

Do you decorate for Valentine’s Day around your home?  I’d love to hear about it down in the comments, so feel free to stop by and say hi!

 

If you liked this post, you can subscribe to Minerva’s Garden via email or RSS, Like us on Facebook, and Follow us on Twitter, and connect with us on You TubePinterest and Google +.  You can also follow us on Linky!

 

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

Thank you so much for your friendship and support–I appreciate it!

Till next time,

I’m participating at:

 Feathered Nest Friday at French Country Cottage

Show and Tell Friday at My Romantic Home

Posted in Valentine's Decor 2014 | Tagged , , | 9 Comments

Valentine’s Day Idea Roundup From Minerva’s Garden

 

Hello to you all!  Hope that your weekend was relaxing and fun.  I have been down with a nasty head cold, but it seems I’m starting to feel better.  This is good, as we are going into our final week of rehearsals for a musical that’s got an audience on Monday, plus I crazily decided to do an audition in the middle of all of this as well–yikes, I have a lot to get crammed into my head!  However, I love this, so I definitely can’t complain.  But what it does mean is that I won’t be here as much until after the show opens in a couple of weeks, so I wanted to do a post to tide you over until I get back :)

 

Also, the sun is out, the birds are enjoying the feeders, the bulbs are starting to make an appearance–in other words, it’s February!  I thought it would be fun to do a little recap of Valentine’s Day ideas that I’ve shared with you all in the past, and I hope that it provides you with inspiration for a little vignette or decoration that you can make inexpensively and enjoy in your home this year.

 

 

Here are some decor ideas:

 

Valentine’s Lampshade Transformation DIY

 

 

Dollar Tree Valentine’s Wreath Tutorial

 

 

Unexpected Thrifted Valentine’s Centerpiece

 

 

 Valentine’s Sideboard

 

And some food ideas for Valentine’s Day:

 

 

Savory Valentine’s Fare and A Tablescape

 

 

Valentine’s Scones

 

And I also have a Pinterest Valentine’s Day Ideas board for you to explore for even more ideas.

 

I hope to try to get pictures of a vignette or two if I have time to do something new for this year–not counting on it, but we’ll see how my time goes.  Now I actually have to try to get my house decorated a bit for Valentine’s Day, so I will bid you all a fond adieu!

 

Do you decorate for Valentine’s Day around your home?  I’d love to hear about it down in the comments, so feel free to stop by and say hi!

 

If you liked this post, you can subscribe to Minerva’s Garden via email or RSS, Like us on Facebook, and Follow us on Twitter, and connect with us on You TubePinterest and Google +.  You can also follow us on Linky!

 

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Thank you so much for your friendship and support–I appreciate it!

Till next time,

I’m participating at:

 

Posted in Valentine's Day Idea Roundup | Tagged , , , | 9 Comments

Yellow Book January Vignette

 

Hello!  Hope you had a great weekend.  It was bright sunshine all weekend here, but unfortunately I got a cold, so wasn’t outside to enjoy a lot of it.  Drinking tea and having chicken soup seems to be helping, so I’m definitely on the mend :)

 

Today I have a little vignette that I put together on top of our dining room china cabinet.  I love to decorate with books, so this one features some books with yellow spines, a cheery yellow to brighten up January’s often-grey skies.

 

 

I love that pretty little crocheted edge on that ivory tablecloth that forms the base of the vignette.  I’d like to use it on my table, too, so may have to look for another one :)

 

 

One of Peter Mayle’s books about living in Provence has the perfect yellow spine, so a little bit of a French theme started appearing.

 

I’ve had this vignette up since the beginning of the month, but I haven’t shown it until now because I have been looking for a new lamp for this spot, and it took me a while to find one.  I think the shape of this one is interesting, and the colors work with the wallpaper and for fall or winter decorating, but I’m pretty sure I’m going to want something lighter and brighter here for spring and summer.  But for now, I’m happy!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Citrus on display also makes me happy at this time of year, too!

 

 

It’s almost February, and time to start thinking about Valentine’s Day–I barely got through January decorating!  We’ll see what happens for February.

 

For other January decorating ideas, you might also like:

 

Snowdrop Bottle Beauty

 

 

How do you like to brighten up your home’s decor for January?  I’d love to hear about it down in the comments, so feel free to stop by and say hi!

 

If you liked this post, you can subscribe to Minerva’s Garden via email or RSS, Like us on Facebook, and Follow us on Twitter, and connect with us on You TubePinterest and Google +.  You can also follow us on Linky!

 

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Thank you so much for your friendship and support–I appreciate it!

Till next time,

I’m participating at:

Met Monday at Between Naps on the Porch

Wow Us Wednesday at Savvy Southern Style

Feathered Nest Friday at French Country Cottage

Show and Tell Friday at My Romantic Home

Posted in Yellow Book January Vignette | Tagged , , , , | 5 Comments

Snowdrop Bottle Beauty

 

Happy Monday!  Take a moment to remember Martin Luther King, Jr. today.  I hope you’re having a great start to your week.

 

Today I wanted to feature a flower that blooms in January.  I got a little sidetracked by pretty, tiny bottles, however.

 

I have a thing for small beautiful bottles.  Here is one way I decorated a pretty little bottle even further.

 

I love the shape of the glass, and how the light plays over the faceted surfaces.  I decided to use some simple but lovely tiny bottles on their own to dress up the window sill in our bathroom.

 

 

I also decided that I better learn how to really use my DSLR camera, so I checked Scott Kelby’s digital photography book 1 out of the library, and tried playing around with some of his ideas.  Shooting in manual is uncharted waters for me, but no time like the present to learn more, right :)

 

 

 

I like how the green beads are backlit, and you can really see the silhouette outlines of the bottles:

 

 

 

Have a super, happy week!

 

(ps–I appear to have an error in some of the html code that is messing up the appearance of some of the pages on my blog.  I’m aware of it, but haven’t been able to track down exactly where the problem is.  I hope you’ll bear with me, and I am working to have it figured out soon!)

 

Do you like tiny bottles, too? How do you use them to decorate?  I’d love to hear about it down in the comments, so feel free to stop by and say hi!

 

If you liked this post, you can subscribe to Minerva’s Garden via email or RSS, Like us on Facebook, and Follow us on Twitter, and connect with us on You TubePinterest and Google +.  You can also follow us on Linky!

 

Follow my blog with Bloglovin

Thank you so much for your friendship and support–I appreciate it!

Till next time,

I’m participating at:

Met Monday at Between Naps on the Porch

Wow Us Wednesday at Savvy Southern Style

Feathered Nest Friday at French Country Cottage

Show and Tell Friday at My Romantic Home

Posted in Bulbs, Snowdrop Bottle Beauty, Winter-Blooming bulbs | Tagged , , , | 7 Comments